Does Colorado Support the Clean Power Plan? Yes. And No.

I have never understood why 43 states – including the great Commonwealth of Massachusetts – have independent elected attorneys general.  I’m sure my new colleague, former Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley, would disagree with me, but I just don’t think that the value of having an AG independent of the Governor is worth the lack of policy consistency.  Exhibit A to my argument is the current dispute in Colorado between Governor John Hickenlooper and Attorney General Cynthia Coffman concerning EPA’s Clean Power Plan.  What’s the problem?

Hickenlooper supports the CPP; Coffman opposes it.  Indeed, Coffman does not just oppose it; on behalf of the State of Colorado, she’s joined the litigation seeking to stop the rule.  Excuse me, but shouldn’t the Governor speak for the citizens of Colorado on such matters?  Absent some kind of conflict of interest requiring independent counsel, the Governor has to be the boss.  I’m sure most citizens see it that way; it would be nice if reality mirrored perception.

I’d assume that the Colorado Governor has authority to retain separate counsel – and I hope my friends in Colorado will tell me if I’m wrong.  I’d love to see Governor Hickenlooper retain his own counsel and intervene in the litigation on the side of EPA.  What would the Court do if Colorado appeared on both sides of the V?

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One thought on “Does Colorado Support the Clean Power Plan? Yes. And No.

  1. Pingback: Who’s the Boss? When State Governors and Attorneys General Clash | State AG Insights

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